October 23, 2008

Cost of servers 20 years ago — request for help!

Posted in Software tagged , , , at 9:30 pm by mj

I’m putting together a presentation, and I need your help!

I’m looking for the cost and specs of typical “commodity” hardware 20 years ago, versus the cost and specs for typical “big guns” at the same time.

I’m also looking for database options other than the usual suspects (Oracle, DB2, Sybase) that may have been available at the time. Cost comparisons are ideal.

In other words… if you were transported back to 1988, and you had to support a large (for the time) data set, and still knew what you know now about scaling … would you have had any alternatives than (something akin to) Oracle on big iron?

Many thanks, and I’ll post a follow-up later.

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October 19, 2008

Restlet: A REST ‘Framework’ for Java

Posted in Development, Software tagged , , , at 2:33 pm by mj

Building an API on the REST architectural style? Building it in Java?

This past week, on a project doing just that, I ran into Restlet. I’d never heard of a REST framework for Java before, but it’s been featured InfoQ, TSS, ONJava, and others over the past three years. (Damn, I need to pay more attention.)

And it kicks ass.

Here’s a quick run-down:

Restlet is an API for developing REST-based services in the same way that Servlet is an API for developing Web-based services. Your application never deals with the Servlet API, HTTP-specific attributes, cookies, sessions, JSPs, or any of that baggage.

Instead, you think and code in terms of REST: Routing, Resources, Representations.

It has an intuitive URL routing system that parses out resource identifiers and other data (that is, a URL template of /user/{user_id} would give you a ‘user_id’ attribute for any URL matching that pattern, which is fed into your User resource).

Resources are easily able to define which of the verbs (GET, POST, PUT, DELETE) they respond to, with default behavior defined for verbs that are unsupported.

There are plug-ins available for SSL and OAuth, an emerging best practice for authenticating third party access to user accounts.

The documentation is a bit lacking. However, there is an excellent IBM developerWorks tutorial on Restlet (registration required) that lays out pretty much everything you need, with a (nearly-)complete example for study.